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Generative AI has opened the floodgates to so many new innovations and AI tools. From AI image generation to AI coding assistants, there is so much to unpack, and we are still learning about new applications day after day. In this article, we’re going to specifically talk about AI coding tools that can help you with software development. You can use the AI coding tools listed below to generate code, fix bugs, explain code snippets, write unit tests, and much more. On that note, let’s go through the list.

1. GitHub Copilot X

If you are a developer and looking for the best AI coding tool, I highly recommend GitHub Copilot X. It’s an AI assistant that can help you with code completion, code explanation, debugging, and more. GitHub Copilot X is powered by the GPT-4 model, which is arguably one of the best general-purpose AI models out there. It’s even better than the purpose-built OpenAI Codex model, a descendant of the GPT-3 series.

Coming to features, GitHub Copilot X is intended to be your helpful AI pair rather than your replacement. It can integrate with every part of your workflow, offer contextual suggestions, fix a piece of code, translate code, write unit tests, and much more. You don’t even need to read the whole documentation. Copilot X can give personalized answers to your queries from the documentation.

github copilot x demo
Source: GitHub

It also keeps track of your pull requests and suggests descriptions around code changes to generate a comprehensive update of all the code merges. You can use Copilot X in your favorite Terminal or IDEs like VS Code, Visual Studio, JetBrains, Neovim, and more. Moreover, Copilot X supports several programming languages, including C, C++, C#, Go, Java, JavaScript, PHP, Python, Ruby, Scala, TypeScript, and more.

To quote some figures from Microsoft’s in-house research, Copilot X helped 74% of the developers focus more on satisfying work and 88% of developers felt more productive. In addition, for repetitive coding tasks, 96% of users were able to achieve them much faster with the help of Copilot X.

In summation, GitHub Copilot X can be your best AI coding assistant to tackle coding challenges. That said, keep in mind that Copilot X is not available to everyone currently. Individual users or businesses who already have GitHub Copilot can join the waitlist for Copilot X. Future pricing has not been decided yet, but Copilot costs $10 per month.

Check out GitHub Copilot X

2. CodeGPT

If you use VS Code extensively for programming, then you can take a look at CodeGPT. It’s a third-party extension developed by Daniel San for VS Code. You can add your own API key to access ChatGPT models, including GPT-4 in CodeGPT, and start using the extension in your codebase. I have personally used the extension, and it’s one of the best AI coding tools for developers.

codegpt features

You can ask CodeGPT any coding-related questions and it will answer your queries right away. In addition, you can generate code, select a code snippet and ask CodeGPT to explain the function, find problems and solutions, refactor the code, document it, and much more. You can also write unit tests for various functions.

It supports 16 programming languages and other than OpenAI’s ChatGPT models, you can also add API keys from other AI services such as Cohere, Anthropic, AI21 Labs, HuggingFace, etc. If you have not got access to Copilot X, you should very well check out CodeGPT.

Check out CodeGPT

3. Codey and Studio Bot by Google

In case you are unaware, Google has also entered the AI coding assistant fray with Codey and Studio Bot. You can use Codey, a coding AI assistant on Google Colab. It’s similar to GitHub Copilot X and offers in-line code suggestions, code generation, autocomplete, debugging, and much more. That said, the feature is not live for everyone yet and only users in the US can get the first access.

google colab AI demo
Source: Google

Codey is built on Google’s PaLM 2 model and supports only Python as of now. You can open Google Colab, launch a notebook, and check if a “Generate” button appears on top. The best part is that it’s free to use, however, paid Colab users will be first in line to get access.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=kfbXQbt7TBg%3Ffeature%3Doembed

Moving to Studio Bot, Google announced a similar AI companion for Android developers. You can use Studio Bot in Android Studio for developing Android apps. Again, the feature is rolled out to US developers first and other countries will get it gradually. Google says the technology is experimental, and it will slowly add new capabilities to the Bot. As for now, you can ask it to generate code, create test cases and update APIs for better compliance.

Check out Codey on Google Colab
Check out Studio Bot for Android Studio

4. Replit Ghostwriter

Replit has also announced its AI coding tool named Ghostwriter. It’s backed by their in-house large language model, which is trained on publicly available code and further tuned by Replit. It supports code completion, code generation, transformation, enhancement, explanation, chat, debugging, and more. According to Replit, it factors in the context of your project and gives a relevant response. It can also automatically detect issues in your code and suggest a fix.

replit ghostwriter debugging
Source: Replit

The best part is that Replit supports a growing list of 16 programming languages, including Bash, C, C#, C++, CSS, Go, JavaScript, Java, PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby, and more. You can dive into an unfamiliar codebase and get started with different frameworks, APIs, and languages using this tool.

Having said that, Replit Ghostwriter is not free to access. You need to subscribe to the Pro plan, which costs $20 per month. In addition to AI coding assistance, you will also get a fast workspace, high resource limits, unlimited private Repls, SSH, and more. To sum up, Replit Ghostwriter is a great way to get started with programming with the help of AI. The ability to run your code in an online IDE simultaneously is an added benefit.

Check out Replit Ghostwriter

5. Amazon CodeWhisperer

In the AI race, Amazon is not far behind and bringing powerful large language models for specific use cases. Amazon CodeWhisperer is a coding-specific LLM that can help you with programming in multiple languages. According to Amazon, CodeWhisperer has been trained on billions of lines of code, and it can generate in-line code similar to Copilot X. You can simply write a comment, and it can generate complete functions based on your existing code.

Amazon CodeWhisperer demo
Source: Amazon

It also has the ability to identify code that resembles open-source training code, allowing you to further tag the code and attribute it with a license. CodeWhisperer comes with built-in code security as well. It can scan and analyze your code to find vulnerabilities and loopholes so you can fix them immediately.

The best part is that Amazon CodeWhisperer can be used in many IDEs including VS Code, IntelliJ IDEA, PyCharm, etc., and supports multiple languages like Python, Java, Javascript, Typescript, C#, and more. Finally, you can use it for free with unlimited code suggestions. That’s pretty awesome, right? So go ahead and check out Amazon CodeWhisperer for the best AI coding assistance.

Check out Amazon CodeWhisperer

6. GPT Engineer

GPT Engineer is a new open-source project that has quickly gained popularity among developers and is one of the best AI coding tools in 2023. It has received 11K stars on GitHub in a few days and continues to receive more features and updates from various contributors. GPT Engineer is an AI Agent similar to Auto-GPT, but it’s meant specifically for building the entire codebase for your project.

gpt engineer terminal demo

You need to tell the agent what you want to build. Then GPT Engineer asks you several questions for clarification and then it starts building it. Unlike Auto-GPT, GPT Engineer has a high success rate and developers have been able to build a full codebase using this project. It goes without saying that you need an OpenAI API, preferably a GPT-4 API. So if you are a coder, go ahead and test out GPT Engineer and check if it works for you.

Check out GPT Engineer

7. ChatGPT 4

While ChatGPT is a general-purpose AI chatbot, it’s vastly powerful at coding as well. After all, the OpenAI GPT-4 model powers most of the AI coding assistants in the market, including Copilot X and CodeGPT listed above. If you have subscribed to ChatGPT Plus ($20 per month), you can access the GPT-4 model and use ChatGPT to write code. I suggest using the GPT-4 model for programming because it’s accurate and usually responds with an error-free code.

chatgpt generates code

In the HumanEval Python coding tasks, GPT-4 scored 67% with zero-shot prompting. That’s the highest an LLM has performed on the HumanEval benchmark. If you use some expert-level prompts on ChatGPT, you are likely to get even better answers. I personally use ChatGPT for coding-related questions, and it does a fantastic job of explaining, generating, and fixing the code.

So if you are a developer or a beginner in programming and looking for the best AI coding tool, I would strongly suggest using ChatGPT 4 for all your coding questions.

Check out ChatGPT 4

8. Google Bard

Google Bard is again a general-purpose AI chatbot, but it’s pretty good at coding, and with newer updates, it has gotten really better at programming. Google has built Google Bard on the PaLM 2 model, which is capable in different various programming languages. It also supports more than 20 programming languages, including C, C++, Python, C#, Javascript, and more.

google bard generated code

You can also use Google Bard to translate code from one language to another. And with a new technique called Implicit Code Execution, Bard is able to run the code in the background to accurately show output. According to Google, the new technique improved Bard’s accuracy by 30% in computation-based prompts. Moreover, you can export the code directly in Google Colab and test the output. To sum up, Google Bard can prove to be one of the best coding AI tools, and you should definitely use it to your advantage.

This article is an implementation of an intro showcase to highlights different features of the app using Jetpack Compose. The implementation is inspired by the TapTargetView which is useful for legacy views.

The implementation is also available as a standalone library Intro-showcase-view on github which you can directly add as a gradle dependency in your project.

I have divided the implementation into byte size steps. Feel free to skip the steps that you understand or jump directly to the step you are interested in. The final implementation will look like above GIF.

Alright, let’s start coding!!

Step 1: Add a feature and draw circles on Canvas

First, let’s add an email fab button aligned to the bottom of the screen.

@Composable
fun ShowcaseExample() {
val context = LocalContext.current
Box {
FloatingActionButton(
onClick = {
Toast.makeText(
context,
"Fab Clicked",
Toast.LENGTH_SHORT
).show()
},
modifier = Modifier
.align(Alignment.BottomEnd)
.padding(bottom = 16.dp, end = 16.dp),
backgroundColor = ThemeColor,
contentColor = Color.White,
elevation = FloatingActionButtonDefaults.elevation(6.dp)
) {
Icon(
Icons.Filled.Email,
contentDescription = "Email"
)
}

IntroShowCase()
}
}

Then, we’ll create two circles. We’ll use Canvas API to draw our circle.

@Composable
fun IntroShowCase() {
Canvas(
modifier = Modifier
.fillMaxSize()
) {
drawCircle(
color = Color.Black
)
drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = 150f
)
}
}

Pretty Simple…

But, that’s not what we want.

Step 2: Find LayoutCoordinates of a fab button and recenter circle.

We have to set a circle offset to highlight our Fab button. And for that, we need a position of our fab button. We’ll use OnGloballyPositionedModifier property of Modifier we’ll have view’s LayoutCoordinates in a callback.

A modifier whose onGlobalyPositioned is called with the final LayoutCoordinates of the Layout when the global position of the content may have changed. Note that it will be called after a composition when the coordinates are finalized.

Let’s modify the modifier of fab button to get its coordinates.

@Composable
fun showcaseExample() {

var target by remember {
mutableStateOf<LayoutCoordinates?>(null)
}
val
context = LocalContext.current

Box {
FloatingActionButton(
....
modifier = Modifier
.align(Alignment.BottomEnd)
.onGloballyPositioned { coordinates ->
target = coordinates
}
....

) {
....

}

target?.let {
IntroShowCase(it)
}
}
}

Now let’s use this coordinate to recenter our circle. Here’s how,

@Composable
fun IntroShowCase(targetCords: LayoutCoordinates) {
val targetRect = targetCords.boundsInRoot()

Canvas(
modifier = Modifier
.fillMaxSize()
) {
drawCircle(
color = Color.Black,
center = targetRect.center
)
drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = 150f,
center = targetRect.center
)
}
}

We have used our target view Rect’s center offset to center our circle.

Oops!!, Where’s our fab button?. Our fab button is overlapped by circles.

Step 3: Blend the overlapped circle to set transparency

We have to set transparency where both circles are overlapped. We’ll use BlendMode to fix this and also let’s fix the radius of the inner circle based on our target view dimension.

BlendMode.Clear : Drop both the source and destination images, leaving nothing.

@Composable
fun IntroShowCase(targetCords: LayoutCoordinates) {
val targetRect = targetCords.boundsInRoot()
val targetRadius = targetRect.maxDimension / 2f + 40f
// 40f extra traget spacing

Canvas(
modifier = Modifier
.fillMaxSize().graphicsLayer (alpha = 0.99f)
) {
drawCircle(
color = Color.Black,
center = targetRect.center
)
drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = targetRadius,
center = targetRect.center,
blendMode = BlendMode.Clear
)
}
}

Perfect!! Isn’t it?

Step: 4 Add circle reveals animation to highlight target

Now, Let’s add an animation around our target view

val animationSpec = infiniteRepeatable<Float>(
animation = tween(2000, easing = FastOutLinearInEasing),
repeatMode = RepeatMode.Restart,
)
val animatables = listOf(
remember { Animatable(0f) },
remember { Animatable(0f) }
)

animatables.forEachIndexed { index, animatable ->
LaunchedEffect(animatable) {
delay(index * 1000L)
animatable.animateTo(
targetValue = 1f, animationSpec = animationSpec
)
}
}

val
dys = animatables.map { it.value }Canvas(
...
) {
...


dys.forEach { dy ->
drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = targetRect.maxDimension * dy * 2f,
center = targetRect.center,
alpha = 1 - dy
)
}
...
}

Let’s try to understand this, We have used infiniteRepeatable , as we want our animation to run infinitely.

animatables is the array of Animatable, We have set up the initial delay for the second wave, We can not use delayMillis as that is considered for repeat animation as well. We just want to delay the initial animation, and then continue the loop without any delay.

we created an animation that will animate between 0 to 1 infinitely. Based on that, we have set up a radius and animated alpha between 1 to 0, which will make waves disappear at the end of an animation.

Let’s see what it look likes,

Step 5: Add texts to describe the feature

Let’s create a data class that holds the value of our targets coordinates, title, subtitle, colors, etc.

data class ShowcaseProperty(
val index: Int,
val coordinates: LayoutCoordinates,
val title: String, val subTitle: String,
val titleColor: Color = Color.White,
val subTitleColor: Color = Color.White,
)

Okay, for now, let’s ignore index field, we’ll use it later to manage the order of when we have multiple features. Let’s refactor our composable a bit.

@Composable
fun IntroShowCase(target: ShowcaseProperty) {
val targetRect = target.coordinates.boundsInRoot()
val targetRadius = targetRect.maxDimension / 2f + 40f

val animationSpec = infiniteRepeatable<Float>(
animation = tween(2000, easing = FastOutLinearInEasing),
repeatMode = RepeatMode.Restart,
)
val animatables = listOf(
remember { Animatable(0f) },
remember { Animatable(0f) }
)

animatables.forEachIndexed { index, animatable ->
LaunchedEffect(animatable) {
delay(index * 1000L)
animatable.animateTo(
targetValue = 1f, animationSpec = animationSpec
)
}
}

val
dys = animatables.map { it.value }

Box {

Canvas(
modifier = Modifier
.fillMaxSize()
.graphicsLayer(alpha = 0.99f)
) {
drawCircle(
color = Color.Black,
center = targetRect.center
)

dys.forEach { dy ->
drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = targetRect.maxDimension * dy * 2f,
center = targetRect.center,
alpha = 1 - dy
)
}

drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = targetRadius,
center = targetRect.center,
blendMode = BlendMode.Clear
)
}

ShowCaseText(
currentTarget = target
)
}
}@Composable
private fun ShowCaseText(
currentTarget: ShowcaseProperty,
) {

Column(modifier = Modifier
.padding(16.dp)
)
{
Text(
text = currentTarget.title,
fontSize = 24.sp,
color = currentTarget.subTitleColor,
fontWeight = FontWeight.Bold
)
Text(text = currentTarget.subTitle, fontSize = 16.sp, color = currentTarget.subTitleColor)
}
}

We just have added two Text for title and subtitle, let’s see the output.

But that’s not even near to our circles.

Step 6: Set offset of Texts

Here we need to check the top and bottom space to set up our text in free space. So we’re going to do it in onGloballyPositioned we’ll calculate the Y offset of our Text, based on total text height and the center of our target. Here’s how.

@Composable
fun IntroShowCaseEx(target: ShowcaseProperty){
....
val targetRect = target.coordinates.boundsInRoot()
val targetRadius = targetRect.maxDimension / 2f + 40f
Box {
ShowCaseText(target, targetRect, targetRadius)
}
....
}
@Composable
private fun ShowCaseText(
currentTarget: ShowcaseProperty,
targetRect: Rect,
targetRadius: Float
) {

var txtOffsetY by remember {
mutableStateOf(0f)
}

Column(modifier = Modifier
.offset(y = with(LocalDensity.current) {
txtOffsetY.toDp()
})
.onGloballyPositioned {
val
textHeight = it.size.height

val
possibleTop =
targetRect.center.y - targetRadius - textHeight

txtOffsetY = if (possibleTop > 0) {
possibleTop
} else {
targetRect.center.y + targetRadius
}
}
.padding(16.dp)
)
{
Text(
text = currentTarget.title,
fontSize = 24.sp,
color = currentTarget.subTitleColor,
fontWeight = FontWeight.Bold
)
Text(text = currentTarget.subTitle, fontSize = 16.sp, color = currentTarget.subTitleColor)
}

}

And here’s the result.

But, the Text is not in the radius of our circle.

Step 7: Calculate outer circle radius

We have to estimate the rectangle which includes our text, and our target view including its spacing.

fun getOuterRadius(textRect: Rect, targetRect: Rect): Float {

val topLeftX = min(textRect.topLeft.x, targetRect.topLeft.x)
val topLeftY = min(textRect.topLeft.y, targetRect.topLeft.y)
val bottomRightX = max(textRect.bottomRight.x, targetRect.bottomRight.x)
val bottomRightY = max(textRect.bottomRight.y, targetRect.bottomRight.y)

val expandedBounds = Rect(topLeftX, topLeftY, bottomRightX, bottomRightY)

val d = sqrt(
expandedBounds.height.toDouble().pow(2.0)
+ expandedBounds.width.toDouble().pow(2.0)
).toFloat()

return (d / 2f)
}

Okay, we just have found the rectangle of our content, and from that, we got the radius.

var textCoordinate: LayoutCoordinates? by remember {
mutableStateOf(null)
}
var
outerRadius by remember {
mutableStateOf(0f)
}
textCoordinate?.let { textCoords ->
val
textRect = textCoords.boundsInRoot()
outerRadius = getOuterRadius(textRect, targetRect) + targetRadius
}Box {
Canvas(
modifier = Modifier
.fillMaxSize()
.graphicsLayer(alpha = 0.99f)
) {
drawCircle(
color = Color.Black,
center = targetRect.center,
radius = outerRadius,
alpha = 0.9f
)

dys.forEach { dy ->
drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = targetRect.maxDimension * dy * 2f,
center = targetRect.center,
alpha = 1 - dy
)
}

drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = targetRadius,
center = targetRect.center,
blendMode = BlendMode.Clear
)
}

ShowCaseText(
currentTarget = target,
targetRect = targetRect,
targetRadius = targetRadius
) {
textCoordinate = it
}
}

Let’s see the result.

Nope, That’s not enough to cover the whole content.

Step 8: change the offset of our outer circle

Now, let’s find the center offset of the outer circle which includes our target and texts.

var outerOffset by remember {
mutableStateOf(Offset(0f, 0f))
}textCoordinate?.let { textCoords ->
val
textRect = textCoords.boundsInRoot()
val textHeight = textCoords.size.height

outerOffset = getOuterCircleCenter(
targetRect, textRect, targetRadius, textHeight
)

outerRadius = getOuterRadius(textRect, targetRect) + targetRadius
}Box {
Canvas(
modifier = Modifier
.fillMaxSize()
.graphicsLayer(alpha = 0.99f)
) {
drawCircle(
color = Color.Black,
center = outerOffset,
radius = outerRadius,
alpha = 0.9f
)

dys.forEach { dy ->
drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = targetRect.maxDimension * dy * 2f,
center = targetRect.center,
alpha = 1 - dy
)
}

drawCircle(
color = Color.White,
radius = targetRadius,
center = targetRect.center,
blendMode = BlendMode.Clear
)
}

ShowCaseText(
currentTarget = target,
targetRect = targetRect,
targetRadius = targetRadius
) {
textCoordinate = it
}
}
fun getOuterCircleCenter(
targetBound: Rect,
textBound: Rect,
targetRadius: Float,
textHeight: Int,
): Offset {
var outerCenterX: Float
var outerCenterY: Float

val onTop =
targetBound.center.y - targetRadius - textHeight > 0

val left = min(
textBound.left,
targetBound.left - targetRadius
)
val right = max(
textBound.right,
targetBound.right + targetRadius
)

val centerY =
if (onTop) targetBound.center.y - targetRadius - textHeight
else targetBound.center.y + targetRadius + textHeight

outerCenterY = centerY
outerCenterX = (left + right) / 2

return Offset(outerCenterX, outerCenterY)
}

Looks cool!!

But what if our target is in a toolbar or bottom bar? Let’s see by changing the alignment of our fab button to TopEnd .

Not so perfect!!.

Step 9: Fix the outer circle center point for the Top and Bottom bar.

We have to recheck our center point of an outer circle when our target is in the toolbar or at the bottom of the screen.

Here’s how

val topArea = 88.dp
val screenHeight = LocalConfiguration.current.screenHeightDp
val
yOffset = with(LocalDensity.current) {
target.coordinates.positionInRoot().y.toDp()
}var outerOffset by remember {
mutableStateOf(Offset(0f, 0f))
}textCoordinate?.let { textCoords ->
val
textRect = textCoords.boundsInRoot()
val textHeight = textCoords.size.height
val
isInGutter = topArea > yOffset || yOffset > screenHeight.dp.minus(topArea)

outerOffset = getOuterCircleCenter(
targetRect, textRect, targetRadius, textHeight, isInGutter
)

outerRadius = getOuterRadius(textRect, targetRect) + targetRadius
}....fun getOuterCircleCenter(
targetBound: Rect,
textBound: Rect,
targetRadius: Float,
textHeight: Int,
isInGutter: Boolean,
): Offset {
var outerCenterX: Float
var outerCenterY: Float

val onTop =
targetBound.center.y - targetRadius - textHeight > 0

val left = min(
textBound.left,
targetBound.left - targetRadius
)
val right = max(
textBound.right,
targetBound.right + targetRadius
)

val centerY =
if (onTop) targetBound.center.y - targetRadius - textHeight
else targetBound.center.y + targetRadius + textHeight

outerCenterY = centerY
outerCenterX = (left + right) / 2

if (isInGutter) {
outerCenterY = targetBound.center.y
}

return Offset(outerCenterX, outerCenterY)
}

If our target is in Gutter we just set targetBound.center.y to outerCenterY and our outerCenterX would be the same as the center X of our content rectangle in both cases.

Let’s check the output now.

Perfect!!

And last but not least…

Step 10: Add circle reveals animation to our outer circle.

val outerAnimatable = remember { Animatable(0.6f) }

LaunchedEffect(target) {
outerAnimatable.snapTo(0.6f)

outerAnimatable.animateTo(
targetValue = 1f,
animationSpec = tween(
durationMillis = 500,
easing = FastOutSlowInEasing,
),
)
}

We have created Animatable with initial value 0.6 as we don’t want our circle to scale from 0.0. If you notice, we have used target here as a key of LaunchedEffect , this will only trigger the inner block when a key changes. Whenever key changes we have reset the current value to the initial value 0.6f using snapTo. Let’s use Animatable value with our outer circle radius.

Box {
Canvas(
modifier = Modifier
.fillMaxSize()
.graphicsLayer(alpha = 0.99f)
) {
drawCircle(
color = Color.Black,
center = outerOffset,
radius = outerRadius * outerAnimatable.value,
alpha = 0.9f
)
}
}

Okay, here’s the result

That’s it!!

Now let’s integrate it with multiple feature showcases. We’re not going to cover all the basic details.onGloballyPositioned may call multiple times so we’ll use an mutableStateMapOf of ShowcaseProperty to avoid duplications.

@Composable
fun ShowcaseSample() {
val targets = remember {
mutableStateMapOf<String, ShowcaseProperty>()
}

Box {
FloatingActionButton(
onClick = {},
modifier = Modifier
.padding(16.dp)
.align(Alignment.BottomEnd)
.onGloballyPositioned { coordinates ->
targets["email"] = ShowcaseProperty(
1, coordinates,
"Check emails", "Click here to check/send emails"
)
},
backgroundColor = ThemeColor,
contentColor = Color.White,
elevation = FloatingActionButtonDefaults.elevation(6.dp)
) {
Icon(
Icons.Filled.Email,
contentDescription = "Email"
)
}
Button(
onClick = {},
modifier = Modifier
.align(Alignment.BottomStart)
.padding(start = 16.dp, bottom = 16.dp)
.onGloballyPositioned { coordinates ->
targets["follow"] = ShowcaseProperty(
2, coordinates,
"Follow me", "Click here to follow"
)
}
) {
Text(text = "Follow")
}


IntroShowCase(targets)
}
}

And Here’s our Intro showcase view

@Composable
fun IntroShowCase(
targets: SnapshotStateMap<String, ShowcaseProperty>,
backgroundColor: Color = Color.Black,
onShowcaseCompleted: () -> Unit
) {
val uniqueTargets = targets.values.sortedBy { it.index }
var
currentTargetIndex by remember { mutableStateOf(0) }

val
currentTarget =
if (uniqueTargets.isNotEmpty() && currentTargetIndex < uniqueTargets.size) uniqueTargets[currentTargetIndex] else null


currentTarget?.let {
TargetContent(it, backgroundColor) {
if
(++currentTargetIndex >= uniqueTargets.size) {
onShowcaseCompleted()
}
}
}
}

Pretty simple!!

Similarly, you can add rest of the views as aShowcaseProperty to make it look like the video shown at the beginning of the article. Full source code is available here.

As I mentioned earlier, the implementation is also available as a library, which you can integrate easily. Feel free to use it in your app and if you want to customize it you’re free to fork.

Creating an entire Android project from scratch here would be too extensive, but I can provide you with a basic outline and code snippets to implement a QR code/barcode scanner in an Android application using Java. We’ll use the ZXing library, which is a popular library for scanning QR codes and barcodes in Android.

Step 1: Set Up Your Android Project
Start by creating a new Android project in Android Studio.

Step 2: Add ZXing Dependency
Add the ZXing library to your build.gradle file (Module: app) to include it in your project:

dependencies {
    implementation 'com.google.zxing:core:3.4.1'
    implementation 'com.journeyapps:zxing-android-embedded:3.6.0'
}

Step 3: Request Camera Permission
In the AndroidManifest.xml, add the following permission:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.CAMERA"/>

Step 4: Create Layout
Create your layout file (e.g., activity_main.xml) with a surface view for the camera preview and a button to start scanning:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent">

    <SurfaceView
        android:id="@+id/surfaceView"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent" />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/scanButton"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_centerInParent="true"
        android:text="Scan QR Code/Barcode" />

</RelativeLayout>

Step 5: Implement Scanner Logic
In your MainActivity.java, implement the QR code/barcode scanning logic:

import android.Manifest;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.content.pm.PackageManager;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.view.SurfaceHolder;
import android.view.SurfaceView;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.Toast;
import androidx.annotation.NonNull;
import androidx.appcompat.app.AppCompatActivity;
import androidx.core.app.ActivityCompat;
import androidx.core.content.ContextCompat;
import com.google.zxing.Result;
import me.dm7.barcodescanner.zxing.ZXingScannerView;

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity implements ZXingScannerView.ResultHandler {

    private static final int CAMERA_PERMISSION_REQUEST_CODE = 200;
    private ZXingScannerView scannerView;
    private Button scanButton;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

        scannerView = new ZXingScannerView(this);
        SurfaceView surfaceView = findViewById(R.id.surfaceView);
        surfaceView.addView(scannerView);

        scanButton = findViewById(R.id.scanButton);
        scanButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View view) {
                checkCameraPermission();
            }
        });
    }

    private void checkCameraPermission() {
        if (ContextCompat.checkSelfPermission(this, Manifest.permission.CAMERA) == PackageManager.PERMISSION_GRANTED) {
            startScanner();
        } else {
            ActivityCompat.requestPermissions(this, new String[]{Manifest.permission.CAMERA}, CAMERA_PERMISSION_REQUEST_CODE);
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onRequestPermissionsResult(int requestCode, @NonNull String[] permissions, @NonNull int[] grantResults) {
        if (requestCode == CAMERA_PERMISSION_REQUEST_CODE) {
            if (grantResults.length > 0 && grantResults[0] == PackageManager.PERMISSION_GRANTED) {
                startScanner();
            } else {
                Toast.makeText(this, "Camera permission required to scan QR codes/Barcodes", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }
        }
    }

    private void startScanner() {
        scannerView.setResultHandler(this);
        scannerView.startCamera();
    }

    @Override
    public void handleResult(Result result) {
        // This method will be called when a QR code / Barcode is scanned.
        // You can handle the scanned data here as per your requirements.
        Toast.makeText(this, "Scanned Result: " + result.getText(), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();

        // Resume scanning after a short delay to capture multiple codes if required.
        scannerView.resumeCameraPreview(this);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPause() {
        super.onPause();
        scannerView.stopCamera();
    }
}

This code sets up a basic QR code/barcode scanner using the ZXing library. When the “Scan QR Code/Barcode” button is clicked, the app checks for camera permission, and if granted, starts the scanner. When a code is scanned, the handleResult() method is called, and the scanned data is displayed in a Toast message.

Remember to handle any exceptions or edge cases based on your specific requirements in a production application.

That’s it! With this code, you should have a functioning QR code/barcode scanner in your Android app.

Create A material Design

Step 1: Set Up Your Android Project
Start by creating a new Android project in Android Studio.

Step 2: Add Material Components Library
In your build.gradle file (Module: app), add the Material Components library as a dependency:

dependencies {
    implementation 'com.google.android.material:material:1.4.0'
}

Step 3: Apply Material Theme
In your styles.xml file (res/values/styles.xml), apply a Material theme. You can use any of the Material themes provided by Android, such as “Theme.MaterialComponents.Light” or “Theme.MaterialComponents.DayNight”:

<style name="AppTheme" parent="Theme.MaterialComponents.Light">
    <!-- Customize theme attributes here -->
</style>

Step 4: Create a Material Design Layout
Create your layout file (e.g., activity_main.xml) using Material Design components:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<androidx.constraintlayout.widget.ConstraintLayout
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:app="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res-auto"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:padding="16dp"
    android:background="@android:color/white"
    tools:context=".MainActivity">

    <com.google.android.material.textfield.TextInputLayout
        android:id="@+id/usernameInputLayout"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="16dp"
        android:hint="Username">

        <com.google.android.material.textfield.TextInputEditText
            android:id="@+id/usernameEditText"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content" />

    </com.google.android.material.textfield.TextInputLayout>

    <com.google.android.material.textfield.TextInputLayout
        android:id="@+id/passwordInputLayout"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="16dp"
        android:hint="Password">

        <com.google.android.material.textfield.TextInputEditText
            android:id="@+id/passwordEditText"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:inputType="textPassword" />

    </com.google.android.material.textfield.TextInputLayout>

    <com.google.android.material.button.MaterialButton
        android:id="@+id/loginButton"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_marginTop="24dp"
        android:text="Login"
        app:layout_constraintStart_toStartOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintEnd_toEndOf="parent"
        app:layout_constraintTop_toBottomOf="@id/passwordInputLayout" />

</androidx.constraintlayout.widget.ConstraintLayout>

In this example, we used the TextInputLayout and TextInputEditText for the username and password fields, along with the MaterialButton for the login button.

Step 5: Apply Material Styles (Optional)
You can further customize your Material Design elements by applying custom styles to your theme or individual components in your styles.xml file.

For example, to change the color of the floating label and the underline color of the TextInputLayout, you can add the following styles:

<style name="AppTheme" parent="Theme.MaterialComponents.Light">
    <!-- Customize theme attributes here -->
    <item name="colorPrimary">@color/colorPrimary</item>
    <item name="colorPrimaryDark">@color/colorPrimaryDark</item>
    <item name="colorAccent">@color/colorAccent</item>
    <item name="textInputStyle">@style/MyTextInputLayoutStyle</item>
</style>

<style name="MyTextInputLayoutStyle" parent="Widget.MaterialComponents.TextInputLayout.FilledBox">
    <item name="hintTextColor">@color/colorHint</item>
    <item name="boxStrokeColor">@color/colorPrimary</item>
    <item name="boxBackgroundColor">@color/colorWhite</item>
</style>

In this example, we changed the hintTextColor, boxStrokeColor, and boxBackgroundColor attributes.

Remember to define the colors used in the styles in your colors.xml file (res/values/colors.xml).

This is just a basic example of applying Material Design to an Android app. Material Design includes many other components and design principles that you can explore to make your app look and feel modern and attractive.

I’m trying to get the URL of a file that is on my drive, knowing its name and the name of the parent folder. But the result is always null.

I’m using a service account with owner permission, I already put the correct credentials inside the project and shared the folder and file with the service account email, and still, the problem continues. When debugging the code it is possible to see that the size of List<File> folders = result.getFiles();  is 0.

Here is the complete code:

import android.content.Context;

import com.google.api.client.googleapis.javanet.GoogleNetHttpTransport;
import com.google.api.client.http.HttpRequestInitializer;
import com.google.api.client.http.HttpTransport;
import com.google.api.client.json.JsonFactory;
import com.google.api.client.json.gson.GsonFactory;
import com.google.api.services.drive.Drive;
import com.google.api.services.drive.DriveScopes;
import com.google.api.services.drive.model.File;
import com.google.api.services.drive.model.FileList;
import com.google.auth.http.HttpCredentialsAdapter;
import com.google.auth.oauth2.GoogleCredentials;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.security.GeneralSecurityException;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;

public class DriveAccessRunnable implements Runnable {

   private static final String APPLICATION_NAME = "School Grade";

   private static final JsonFactory JSON_FACTORY = GsonFactory.getDefaultInstance();

   private static Drive driveService;
   private final Context context;
   private final String parentFolderTitle;
   private final String fileName;
   private final DriveAccessCallback callback;

   public DriveAccessRunnable(Context context, String parentFolderTitle, String fileName, DriveAccessCallback callback) {
      this.context = context;
      this.parentFolderTitle = parentFolderTitle;
      this.fileName = fileName;
      this.callback = callback;
   }

   @Override
   public void run() {
      try {
         // Google Drive access code
         HttpTransport httpTransport = GoogleNetHttpTransport.newTrustedTransport();
         driveService = new Drive.Builder(httpTransport, JSON_FACTORY, getHttpRequestInitializer())
                 .setApplicationName(APPLICATION_NAME)
                 .build();

         // Get the URL of the file or null if not found
         String fileUrl = getFileUrl(parentFolderTitle, fileName);

        
         // Call the callback with the result
         callback.onFileUrlReceived(fileUrl);
      } catch (IOException | GeneralSecurityException e) {
         e.printStackTrace();
         // Call the callback with an error result
         callback.onError(e.getMessage());
      }

   }

   private HttpRequestInitializer getHttpRequestInitializer() throws IOException {
      InputStream credentialsStream = context.getResources().openRawResource(R.raw.credentials);

      GoogleCredentials credentials = GoogleCredentials.fromStream(credentialsStream)
              .createScoped(Collections.singletonList(DriveScopes.DRIVE_FILE));

      return new HttpCredentialsAdapter(credentials);
   }

   private String getFileUrl(String parentFolderTitle, String fileName) throws IOException {
     
       // Search parent folder by title
      FileList result = driveService.files().list()
              .setQ("mimeType='application/vnd.google-apps.folder' and trashed=false and name='" + parentFolderTitle + "'")
              .setSpaces("drive")
              .setFields("files(id)")
              .execute();

      List<File> folders = result.getFiles();

      if (!folders.isEmpty()) {
         String parentFolderId = folders.get(0).getId();

         
         // Browse files inside the parent folder
         result = driveService.files().list()
                 .setQ("'" + parentFolderId + "' in parents and trashed=false")
                 .setFields("files(name, webViewLink)")
                 .execute();

         List<File> files = result.getFiles();
         for (File file : files) {
            if (file.getName().equals(fileName)) {
               return file.getWebViewLink();
            }
         }
      }

      return null;
   }


   public interface DriveAccessCallback {
      void onFileUrlReceived(String fileUrl);
      void onError(String errorMessage);
   }
}

So I am trying to implement app links from web search to open the app and I want it to use regex to match the below URL example…

/(url-1|url-2)/

Where it can be either of those strings, but it doesn’t seem to work. Is this possible in the pattern matcher?

Anywhere exists a tool to test this, can’t seem to find any other than generic regex testers which are different to the android format here.

I’ll provide you with a sample code and explanation for creating a profile screen with a RecyclerView using Android DataBinding. Here’s a step-by-step guide:

Step 1: Set up your project
Create a new Android project in Android Studio. Make sure you have the necessary dependencies in your build.gradle file:

android {
    // ...
    dataBinding {
        enabled = true
    }
}

Step 2: Create the layout files
Create the following layout files in your project:

activity_profile.xml:

<layout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <data>
        <variable
            name="viewModel"
            type="com.example.yourapp.ProfileViewModel" />
    </data>

    <!-- Your profile screen layout here -->
    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:orientation="vertical">

        <androidx.recyclerview.widget.RecyclerView
            android:id="@+id/recyclerView"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            app:items="@{viewModel.blogItems}"
            app:layoutManager="androidx.recyclerview.widget.LinearLayoutManager"
            app:itemLayout="@layout/item_blog" />
    </LinearLayout>
</layout>

item_blog.xml:

<layout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">
    <data>
        <variable
            name="blog"
            type="com.example.yourapp.BlogItem" />
    </data>

    <!-- Your blog item layout here -->
</layout>

Step 3: Create the ViewModel and BlogItem classes
Create the following classes in your project:

ProfileViewModel.kt:

class ProfileViewModel : ViewModel() {
    val blogItems: LiveData<List<BlogItem>> = MutableLiveData(
        listOf(
            BlogItem("Title 1", "Content 1"),
            BlogItem("Title 2", "Content 2"),
            BlogItem("Title 3", "Content 3")
        )
    )
}

class BlogItem(val title: String, val content: String)

Step 4: Create the Adapter and ViewHolder
Create the following classes in your project:

BlogAdapter.kt:

class BlogAdapter(private val blogItems: List<BlogItem>) :
    RecyclerView.Adapter<BlogAdapter.ViewHolder>() {

    override fun onCreateViewHolder(parent: ViewGroup, viewType: Int): ViewHolder {
        val inflater = LayoutInflater.from(parent.context)
        val binding: ItemBlogBinding = DataBindingUtil.inflate(
            inflater, R.layout.item_blog, parent, false
        )
        return ViewHolder(binding)
    }

    override fun onBindViewHolder(holder: ViewHolder, position: Int) {
        holder.bind(blogItems[position])
    }

    override fun getItemCount(): Int = blogItems.size

    class ViewHolder(private val binding: ItemBlogBinding) :
        RecyclerView.ViewHolder(binding.root) {

        fun bind(blogItem: BlogItem) {
            binding.blog = blogItem
            binding.executePendingBindings()
        }
    }
}

Step 5: Connect everything in your Activity or Fragment
Update your ProfileActivity or ProfileFragment to include the following code:

ProfileActivity.kt:

class ProfileActivity : AppCompatActivity() {

    private lateinit var binding: ActivityProfileBinding

    override fun onCreate(savedInstanceState: Bundle?) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState)
        binding = DataBindingUtil.setContentView(this, R.layout.activity_profile)

        val viewModel = ViewModelProvider(this).get(ProfileViewModel::class.java)
        binding.viewModel = viewModel

        val adapter = BlogAdapter(viewModel.blogItems.value ?: emptyList())
        binding.recyclerView.adapter = adapter
    }
}

That’s it! You have now created a profile screen with a RecyclerView using Android DataBinding. Make sure to replace com.example.yourapp it with the appropriate package name in the code.

Remember to customize the layout files and the BlogItem class according to your requirements. You can also update the blog items dynamically by modifying the blogItems LiveData in the ViewModel.

Hope this helps you get started with your profile screen implementation!

Here’s an example of an Android application that allows users to choose an image from the camera or gallery and perform cropping functionality using the “Android Image Cropper” library.

Step 1: Set up the project

Start by creating a new Android project in Android Studio. Make sure you have the necessary dependencies and permissions in your project’s build.gradle file:

dependencies {
    implementation 'com.theartofdev.edmodo:android-image-cropper:2.8.+'
}

Also, make sure you have the necessary permissions in your AndroidManifest.xml file:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.READ_EXTERNAL_STORAGE" />
<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.WRITE_EXTERNAL_STORAGE" />
<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.CAMERA" />

Step 2: Create the layout

Create a layout file called activity_main.xml with the following code:

<RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:paddingLeft="16dp"
    android:paddingTop="16dp"
    android:paddingRight="16dp"
    android:paddingBottom="16dp"
    tools:context=".MainActivity">

    <ImageView
        android:id="@+id/imageView"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:adjustViewBounds="true"
        android:scaleType="centerInside"
        android:src="@drawable/placeholder" />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/btnChooseImage"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@id/imageView"
        android:text="Choose Image" />

    <Button
        android:id="@+id/btnCropImage"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_below="@id/btnChooseImage"
        android:text="Crop Image"
        android:enabled="false" />

</RelativeLayout>

Step 3: Implement the functionality in the MainActivity

Open MainActivity.java and add the following code:

import android.Manifest;
import android.content.Intent;
import android.content.pm.PackageManager;
import android.graphics.Bitmap;
import android.net.Uri;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.provider.MediaStore;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.ImageView;

import androidx.annotation.NonNull;
import androidx.appcompat.app.AppCompatActivity;
import androidx.core.app.ActivityCompat;
import androidx.core.content.ContextCompat;

import com.theartofdev.edmodo.cropper.CropImage;
import com.theartofdev.edmodo.cropper.CropImageView;

import java.io.IOException;

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

    private static final int REQUEST_CAMERA_PERMISSION = 200;
    private static final int REQUEST_IMAGE_CAPTURE = 100;
    private static final int REQUEST_IMAGE_GALLERY = 101;

    private ImageView imageView;
    private Button btnChooseImage;
    private Button btnCropImage;

    private Uri imageUri;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

        imageView = findViewById(R.id.imageView);
        btnChooseImage = findViewById(R.id.btnChooseImage);
        btnCropImage = findViewById(R.id.btnCropImage);

        btnChooseImage.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                chooseImage();
            }
        });

        btnCropImage.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View v) {
                cropImage(imageUri);
            }
        });
    }

    private void chooseImage() {
        if (ContextCompat.checkSelfPermission(this, Manifest.permission.CAMERA) != PackageManager.PERMISSION_GRANTED) {
            ActivityCompat.requestPermissions(this, new String[]{Manifest.permission.CAMERA}, REQUEST_CAMERA_PERMISSION);
        } else {
            openImageChooser();
        }
    }

    private void openImageChooser() {
        Intent intent = new Intent(Intent.ACTION_GET_CONTENT);
        intent.setType("image/*");
        startActivityForResult(intent, REQUEST_IMAGE_GALLERY);
    }

    private void cropImage(Uri imageUri) {
        CropImage.activity(imageUri)
                .setGuidelines(CropImageView.Guidelines.ON)
                .setAspectRatio(1, 1)
                .start(this);
    }

    @Override
    protected void onActivityResult(int requestCode, int resultCode, Intent data) {
        super.onActivityResult(requestCode, resultCode, data);

        if (requestCode == REQUEST_IMAGE_CAPTURE && resultCode == RESULT_OK) {
            cropImage(imageUri);
        } else if (requestCode == REQUEST_IMAGE_GALLERY && resultCode == RESULT_OK && data != null) {
            try {
                Bitmap bitmap = MediaStore.Images.Media.getBitmap(getContentResolver(), data.getData());
                imageView.setImageBitmap(bitmap);
                imageUri = data.getData();
                btnCropImage.setEnabled(true);
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        } else if (requestCode == CropImage.CROP_IMAGE_ACTIVITY_REQUEST_CODE) {
            CropImage.ActivityResult result = CropImage.getActivityResult(data);
            if (resultCode == RESULT_OK) {
                Uri resultUri = result.getUri();
                try {
                    Bitmap croppedBitmap = MediaStore.Images.Media.getBitmap(getContentResolver(), resultUri);
                    imageView.setImageBitmap(croppedBitmap);
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            } else if (resultCode == CropImage.CROP_IMAGE_ACTIVITY_RESULT_ERROR_CODE) {
                Exception error = result.getError();
                error.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void onRequestPermissionsResult(int requestCode, @NonNull String[] permissions, @NonNull int[] grantResults) {
        super.onRequestPermissionsResult(requestCode, permissions, grantResults);
        if (requestCode == REQUEST_CAMERA_PERMISSION && grantResults.length > 0 && grantResults[0] == PackageManager.PERMISSION_GRANTED) {
            openImageChooser();
        }
    }
}

That’s it! Now you have an Android application that allows users to choose an image from the camera or gallery and perform cropping functionality. Remember to replace the placeholder image with an actual placeholder image of your choice.

Note: Don’t forget to add the necessary runtime permissions check in your code to handle permissions for accessing the camera and gallery.

Step 1: Sign up for a Paytm merchant account
To integrate the PayTM payment gateway, you need to sign up for a PayTM merchant account. Visit the PayTM Developer Portal (https://developer.paytm.com/) and follow the registration process to create your merchant account.

Step 2: Set up PayTM SDK in your project

  1. Open your Android project in Android Studio.
  2. Add the following dependency to your app-level build. gradle file:
implementation 'com.paytm:pgplussdk:1.4.3'
  1. Sync your project to download the PayTM SDK.

Step 3: Obtain merchant credentials
After signing up for a merchant account, you will receive the necessary credentials from PayTM. These include the merchant ID and merchant key, which you’ll need for integration.

Step 4: Create a PayTM activity
Create a new activity in your Android project to handle the PayTM payment process. For example, create a PaytmActivity.java file.

Step 5: Implement the PayTM payment process
In the PaytmActivity.java file, implement the following steps:

  1. Initialize the PayTM service in the onCreate() method:
PaytmPGService service = PaytmPGService.getStagingService(); // or PaytmPGService.getProductionService() for production environment
  1. Set up the payment parameters and listener:
HashMap<String, String> paramMap = new HashMap<>();
paramMap.put("MID", "YOUR_MERCHANT_ID");
paramMap.put("ORDER_ID", "UNIQUE_ORDER_ID");
paramMap.put("CUST_ID", "CUSTOMER_ID");
paramMap.put("CHANNEL_ID", "WAP");
paramMap.put("TXN_AMOUNT", "AMOUNT");
paramMap.put("WEBSITE", "WEBSTAGING"); // for staging environment, use "DEFAULT" for production
paramMap.put("INDUSTRY_TYPE_ID", "Retail");
paramMap.put("CALLBACK_URL", "CALLBACK_URL"); // the URL to which PayTM will send the payment response

PaytmOrder order = new PaytmOrder(paramMap);

service.initialize(order, null);

Replace the placeholders with the appropriate values from your merchant account.

  1. Start the payment transaction:
service.startPaymentTransaction(this, true, true, new PaytmPaymentTransactionCallback() {
    @Override
    public void onTransactionResponse(Bundle inResponse) {
        // Handle the payment response
    }

    @Override
    public void networkNotAvailable() {
        // Handle network error
    }

    @Override
    public void clientAuthenticationFailed(String inErrorMessage) {
        // Handle authentication error
    }

    @Override
    public void someUIErrorOccurred(String inErrorMessage) {
        // Handle UI error
    }

    @Override
    public void onErrorLoadingWebPage(int iniErrorCode, String inErrorMessage, String inFailingUrl) {
        // Handle web page loading error
    }

    @Override
    public void onBackPressedCancelTransaction() {
        // Handle transaction cancellation
    }

    @Override
    public void onTransactionCancel(String inErrorMessage, Bundle inResponse) {
        // Handle transaction cancellation
    }
});
  1. Handle the payment response in the onTransactionResponse() method:
@Override
public void onTransactionResponse(Bundle inResponse) {
    String status = inResponse.getString("STATUS");
    String message = inResponse.getString("RESPMSG");

    if (status != null && status.equals("TXN_SUCCESS")) {
        // Payment was successful
    } else {
        // Payment failed
    }
}

Step 6: Connect the PayTM activity to your app
Finally, you need to connect the PayTM activity to your e-commerce app. For example, you can add a button to the shopping cart screen and launch the PayTM activity when the user selects the payment option.

That’s it! You have now integrated the PayTM payment gateway into your Android e-commerce app. Remember to replace the placeholder values with your actual merchant credentials and customize the code according to your app’s requirements.

Please note that this guide provides a basic integration example. For a complete and detailed implementation, including error handling and additional features, you may need to refer to the official PayTM documentation or consult their support resources.

Slide transition between screens is common in Android applications. We can use the navigation components or a swipe-able view to create this transition. A common swipe-able view is ViewPager2. The ViewPager library has been around for quite a while.

Introduction

This view allows the developer to display views or fragments to the user in a swipe-able format. This feature is common in content display applications and in app setups.

ViewPager2 is often integrated with TabLayout. A TabLayout indicates the current page and allows a user to switch through pages.

Prerequisites

To follow through with this tutorial, you will need to:

  1. Have Android Studio installed.
  2. Have a basic knowledge of building Android applications.
  3. Have a basic understanding of Kotlin programming language.

Let’s get started!

  1. First, let’s set up the necessary dependencies in your app-level build.gradle file:
implementation 'androidx.viewpager2:viewpager2:1.0.0'
implementation 'com.google.android.material:material:1.4.0'
  1. Next, create a new layout file for your main activity (activity_main.xml). The layout will contain a TabLayout and a ViewPager2:
<androidx.coordinatorlayout.widget.CoordinatorLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent">

    <com.google.android.material.appbar.AppBarLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content">

        <com.google.android.material.tabs.TabLayout
            android:id="@+id/tabLayout"
            android:layout_width="match_parent"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:background="@color/colorPrimary"
            app:tabTextColor="@color/tab_text_color"
            app:tabSelectedTextColor="@color/tab_selected_text_color"
            app:tabIndicatorColor="@color/tab_indicator_color" />

    </com.google.android.material.appbar.AppBarLayout>

    <androidx.viewpager2.widget.ViewPager2
        android:id="@+id/viewPager"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="match_parent"
        android:layout_marginTop="?attr/actionBarSize"
        app:layout_behavior="@string/appbar_scrolling_view_behavior" />

</androidx.coordinatorlayout.widget.CoordinatorLayout>
  1. Create a new layout file for each of your blog fragments (fragment_blog.xml). Customize it to your needs:
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:orientation="vertical">

    <!-- Add your blog content views here -->

</LinearLayout>
  1. Create a new class for your ViewPager adapter (BlogPagerAdapter.java):
import androidx.annotation.NonNull;
import androidx.fragment.app.Fragment;
import androidx.fragment.app.FragmentActivity;
import androidx.viewpager2.adapter.FragmentStateAdapter;

import java.util.List;

public class BlogPagerAdapter extends FragmentStateAdapter {
    private List<Fragment> fragments;

    public BlogPagerAdapter(@NonNull FragmentActivity fragmentActivity, List<Fragment> fragments) {
        super(fragmentActivity);
        this.fragments = fragments;
    }

    @NonNull
    @Override
    public Fragment createFragment(int position) {
        return fragments.get(position);
    }

    @Override
    public int getItemCount() {
        return fragments.size();
    }
}
  1. Finally, in your MainActivity, set up the TabLayout and ViewPager2:
import android.os.Bundle;

import androidx.appcompat.app.AppCompatActivity;
import androidx.fragment.app.Fragment;
import androidx.viewpager2.widget.ViewPager2;

import com.google.android.material.tabs.TabLayout;
import com.google.android.material.tabs.TabLayoutMediator;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity {

    private ViewPager2 viewPager;
    private TabLayout tabLayout;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

        viewPager = findViewById(R.id.viewPager);
        tabLayout = findViewById(R.id.tabLayout);

        List<Fragment> fragments = new ArrayList<>();
        fragments.add(new BlogFragment1());
        fragments.add(new BlogFragment2());
        fragments.add(new BlogFragment3());

        BlogPagerAdapter adapter = new BlogPagerAdapter(this, fragments);
        viewPager.setAdapter(adapter);

        new TabLayoutMediator(tabLayout, viewPager, (tab, position) -> {
            // Customize the tab names as per your requirement
            switch (position) {
                case 0:
                    tab.setText("Blog 1");
                    break;
                case 1:
                    tab.setText("Blog 2");
                    break;
                case 2:
                    tab.setText("Blog 3");
                    break;
            }
        }).attach();
    }
}

That’s it! You can now create separate fragments (BlogFragment1, BlogFragment2, etc.) and customize them for each blog page.

Note: Make sure to replace the colors and other resources with your own preferences in the XML files. Also, remember to register the MainActivity in your AndroidManifest.xml file.

This is a basic example to get you started. You can further enhance it with additional features and customization based on your requirements.

Android studio XML, Kotlin payment app ui with complete source code for free by Vishal Swami. Ideal for payment apps, homepage design templates etc.


GitHub Link:- https://github.com/vishaldroidx/PaymentAppUI-Android

Credits:

 © All contents from GitHub
AuthorVishal Swami

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